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Poetry

Hello, I am gonna try to get up as much poetry stuff as possible but i would appreciate it if other people could lend me their notes so I can put them up on the site!

Metaphor

Personification

Onomatopoeia

Assonance

Simile

Alliteration

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Metaphor

met·a·phor (mt-fôr, -fr)
n.

A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in “a sea of troubles” or “All the world's a stage” (Shakespeare).

Metaphor, use of a word or phrase denoting one kind of idea or object in place of another word or phrase for the purpose of suggesting a likeness between the two. Thus, in the biblical Book of Psalms, the writer speaks of God's law as "a light to his feet and a lamp to his path." Other instances of metaphor are contained in the sentences "He uttered a volley of oaths" and "The man tore through the building." 

Metaphor- consists of statements, which say one thing in another in an interesting manner.

Examples 

1.school is a prison for children

2.spring is a warm hug

3.life is a roller coaster

Without using like!

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Personification

per·son·i·fi·ca·tion (pr-sn-f-kshn)
n.

A figure of speech in which inanimate objects or abstractions are endowed with human qualities or are represented as possessing human form, as in Hunger sat shivering on the road or Flowers danced about the lawn. Also called prosopopeia.

Personification, representation of inanimate objects or abstract ideas as living beings, as in the sentences "Necessity is the mother of invention,""Lean famine stalked the land," and "Night enfolded the town in its ebon wings."

Special kind of metaphor in which human characteristics are given to non-human things.

For Example:

-everyone know that a carrot screams when grated

-that a peach bleeds when torn apart.

-do you believe an orange insensitive.

-that tomatoes spill their brains painlessly

 (quoted from vegetarians)

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Onomatopoeia

on·o·mat·o·poe·ia (n-mt-p, -mät-)
n.
The formation or use of words such as buzz or murmur that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to.
 
Onomatopoeia, imitation of natural sounds by words. Examples in English are the italicized words in the phrases "the humming bee,""the cackling hen,""the whizzing arrow," and "the buzzing saw."

Onomatopoeia is poetry in which words are used to make sounds

Examples:

'Croak’ echoes the sound made by a frog.

'Slam’ imitates the sound of a door closing forcefully.

HOW TO USE?

At dusk the bats

Fluttery flutters

Squeaking and stuttering

Twirling and turning

And skirling and whirling...

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Assonance

as·so·nance (s-nns)
n.

The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.

Audio Example...

When 2 or more words have the same vowel sounds. Call + calm are assonance and feel + wheel are not because they are a rhyme.

Me-key

Fall-calm

Fort-lord

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Simile

sim·i·le (sm-l)
A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in “How like the winter hath my absence been” or “So are you to my thoughts as food to life” (Shakespeare).

Simile, specific comparison by means of the words "like" or "as" between two kinds of ideas or objects. Examples of the simile are contained in the sentence "Christianity shone like a beacon in the black night of paganism" and in the line by the English poet William Wordsworth: "But, like a thirsty wind, to roam about."

Definition- a figure of speech in which one thing is compared to another. With "like" or "as"

Example: He's fit as a fiddle; he went through like a hot knife through butter.

1. Think independently, make up your own simile.

2. "She was soft as silk", describe what the simile is saying.

3. Explain the difference between a simile and a metaphor

Metaphor- the application of a word or phrase to something that it does apply to literally, in order to indicate a comparison with the literal usage.

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Alliteration

al·lit·er·a·tion (-lt-rshn)
The repetition of the same sounds or of the same kinds of sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables, as in “on scrolls of silver snowy sentences” (Hart Crane). Modern alliteration is predominantly consonantal; certain literary traditions, such as Old English verse, also alliterate using vowel sounds.

Alliteration, repetition of the initial letter (generally a consonant) or first sound of several words, marking the stressed syllables in a line of poetry or prose. A simple example is the phrase "through thick and thin." The device is used to emphasize meaning and thus can be effectively employed in oratory. Alliteration is a characteristic of Anglo-Saxon poetry, notably the epic Beowulf; it is still used, with modifications, by modern poets.

Hear A Actor Speaking a Alliteration...

Definition: the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of several words in a line or sentence

Example:

1. Bopanna bulldozes buxom buzzard buttocks in a burgundy building.

2. Kuba kisses kangaroo’s knickerbockers while causing a kafuffle.

3. Max moons Marvin on Mondays while mowing my mustache.

4. Sheida seduces secondary sailors while sucking on salty sausages.

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Last modified: June 06, 2001